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Security of 5G networks: EU Member States complete national risk assessments

Following the Commission Recommendation for a common European approach to the security of 5G networks, 24 EU Member States have now completed the first step and submitted national risk assessments. These assessments will feed into the next phase, a EU-wide risk assessment which will be completed by 1 October. Commissioner for the Security Union, Julian King, and Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, welcomed this important step forward and said:

“We are pleased to see that most Member States have now submitted their risk assessments. Following the support expressed by the European Council on 22 March for a concerted approach, Member States responded promptly to our call for concrete measures to help ensure the cybersecurity of 5G networks across the EU. The national risk assessments are essential to make sure that Member States are adequately prepared for the deployment of the next generation of wireless connectivity that will soon form the backbone of our societies and economies.

We urge Member States to remain committed to the concerted approach and to use this important step to gain momentum for a swift and secure rollout of 5G networks. Close EU-wide cooperation is essential both for achieving strong cybersecurity and for reaping the full benefits, which 5G will have to offer for people and businesses.

The completion of the risk assessments underlines the commitment of Member States not only to set high standards for security but also to make full use of this groundbreaking technology. We hope that the outcomes will be taken into account in the process of 5G spectrum auctions and network deployment, which is taking place across the EU now and in the coming months. Several Member States have already taken steps to reinforce applicable security requirements while others are considering introducing new measures in the near future.

We need all key players, big and small, to accelerate their efforts and join us in building a common framework aimed at ensuring consistently high levels of security. We look forward to continuing our close cooperation with Member States as we begin the work on an EU-wide risk assessment, due to be complete by 1 October, that will help to develop a European approach to protecting the integrity of 5G.”

National risk assessments include an overview of:

·    the main threats and actors affecting 5G networks;

·    the degree of sensitivity of 5G network components and functions as well as other assets; and

·    various types of vulnerabilities, including both technical ones and other types of vulnerabilities, such as those potentially arising from the 5G supply chain.

In addition, the work on national risk assessments involved a range of responsible actors in the Member States, including cybersecurity and telecommunication authorities and security and intelligence services, strengthening their cooperation and coordination.

Next Steps

Based on the information received, Member States, together with the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA), will prepare a coordinated EU-wide risk assessment by 1 October 2019. In parallel, ENISA is analysing the 5G threat landscape as an additional input. 

By 31 December 2019, the NIS Cooperation Group that leads the cooperation efforts together with the Commission will develop and agree on a toolbox of mitigating measures to address the risks identified in the risk assessments at Member State and EU level.

Following the recent entry into force of the Cybersecurity Act at the end of June, the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity will set up an EU-wide certification framework. Member States are encouraged to cooperate with the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity to prioritise a certification scheme covering 5G networks and equipment.

By 1 October 2020, Member States should assess in cooperation with the Commission, the effects of measures taken to determine whether there is a need for further action. This assessment should take into account the coordinated European risk assessment.

Background

Fifth generation (5G) networks will form essential digital infrastructure in the future, connecting billions of objects and systems, including in critical sectors such as energy, transport, banking, and health, as well as industrial control systems carrying sensitive information and supporting safety systems.

The European Commission recommended on 26 March 2019 a set of concrete actions to assess cybersecurity risks of 5G networks and to strengthen preventive measures, following the support from Heads of State or Government for a concerted approach to the security of 5G networks.

The Commission called on Member States to complete national risk assessments and review national measures as well as to work together at EU level on a coordinated risk assessment and a common toolbox of mitigating measures.

Spotlight: How an Italian port illustrates the future of China-Europe ties

(Xinhua) — The port in the small Italian city of Vado Ligure is the latest incarnation of strengthened ties between China and Europe.

With stakes co-held by a Netherlands-headquartered company and two Chinese partners, the Vado Gateway terminal upon completion in December will be able to accommodate the world’s largest container ships, while cutting down on costs and time for cargo entering and leaving the port.

Regarded as an example of cooperation between European and Chinese businesses, the port is expected to bolster the local economy, create more jobs and further open the northwestern Italian region to outside markets.

As the first member of the Group of Seven to join the Belt and Road Initiative, Italy has come to benefit from aligning its plan to develop its northern ports and the InvestItalia program with the China-proposed initiative, which seeks to improve interconnectivity between Asia, Europe, Africa and beyond.

Last year, the collapse of the Morandi bridge in the north Italian city of Genoa, not far from Vado Ligure, sent at least 30 cars into the riverbed and train tracks 45 meters (130 feet) below, killing dozens of people.

Such a tragedy underlines the urgency for Italy to upgrade its infrastructure, some of which is in desperate need of repair. In Vado Ligure, locals describe the upgrade as the largest of its kind in years.

Better infrastructure like ports, roads and bridges could help bring countries closer and strengthen ties, undergirding foundations for further cooperation.

“If we are able to update and upgrade our road and rail infrastructure, we can be the Chinese door to Central Europe,” Gian Enzo Duci, professor at the University of Genoa and president of Federagenti, the Italian National Federation of Ship Brokers & Agents, said.

In response to some claims that China’s investment in European infrastructure would somehow pose geopolitical challenges, Duci said such fears are unfounded.

“We still have military presence of the Unites States in our country, why should we be scared of the economic presence of Chinese interest?” one Italian shipping expert said bluntly.

While the resurgence of protectionism and unilateralism has cast a lingering shadow on global commerce, the economic and trade links between China and Europe, two defenders of multilateralism, have continuously expanded over the years.

The European Union (EU) has been China’s largest trading partner for more a decade while the Asian country is the bloc’s second largest trading partner. In 2018, China-EU trade volume hit a record high, exceeding 682 billion U.S. dollars.

With cooperation and exchanges between China and Europe as strong as ever, more European cities – big or small, rich or poor – stand to benefit. Vado Ligure is a case in point.

Digital Single Market: Europeans are aware of rules against unjustified geo-blocking

Seven months after new rules against unjustified geo-blocking began to apply, general consumer awareness of the new rules against restrictions for online shopping and cross-border sales is already high.

A Eurobarometer survey published today shows that just a few months after the new rules on geo-blocking started to apply, 50% of EU citizens are generally aware of EU action to tackle unjustified discrimination by traders. However, more efforts are needed to ensure wider knowledge of the specific digital rights enshrined in EU law, since only 29% of respondents know which rights specifically concern them.

Vice-President for the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip said: “By banning unjustified geo-blocking last December we made another concrete step for Europe’s people and businesses to get the most and best from the digital age. I am now pleased to see that Europeans are largely enjoying their new digital right, which is part of a total of 35 new digital rights and freedoms that the Digital Single Market has created, as a new legal environment has fallen into place.”

Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, added: “The new rules ending unjustified geo-blocking benefit consumers and traders alike, offering fairer access to products and services within the EU single market. Companies that continue to restrict access to consumers are quite simply breaking the law. The Commission will continue to monitor the situation to ensure that the rules are complied with.”

Growing interest to access cross-border content

The Eurobarometer survey published today is part of the Commission’s ongoing evaluation of consumer needs and market realities in sectors that are currently not covered or only partially covered by the geo-blocking rules. This evaluation will feed into an initial review of the rules, planned for March 2020, which will look into whether there is need to extend the scope of the Regulation. For example, the survey clearly shows that audio-visual and other electronically supplied copyright-protected content, such as music streaming and downloading, e-books and games, is among the most popular content sought by consumers across borders. This type of content is not covered by the current rules, yet it is likely that it will merit specific attention under EU law in the near future.

In particular, the number of internet users trying to get cross-border access to content has nearly doubled over the last four years (from 8% in 2015 to 15% in 2019). The most popular types of content sought across borders is audio-visual (sought by 9% of respondents) and music (8%). The survey also indicates that this trend is likely to continue, driven by young people in particular; the percentage of 15 to 24 year-old respondents who have tried to access these services across borders is 28%, nearly double the overall figure.

The most common reasons for trying to access such content are lack of availability in the respondents’ own country (44%), followed by the quest for a wider choice (39%). A majority of those who did not try to have access to content meant for users in another EU country would nonetheless still be interested in doing so (in particular audio-visual with 31% and music with 29%, with even higher figures for the younger generations).

Background

The Regulation against unjustified geo-blocking, which entered into force on 3 December 2018, addresses unjustified online sales discrimination based on customers’ nationality, place of residence or place of establishment within the internal market. It does not oblige traders to allow access to their content, nor sell or deliver across the whole EU, but rather prohibits traders from discriminating against customers based on their nationality, place of residence or place of establishment, if the trader already delivers to their particular Member State.

This regulation is part of a series of rules on e-commerce aimed at boosting cross-border online sales in the EU, for the benefit of the consumers, who will enjoy more choice and more guarantees, as well as for the online sellers. In particular:

Thanks to the Digital Single Market strategy, Europeans can, since April 2018, access their online subscriptions to films, sports events, e-books, video games or music services while travelling to another Member State. In addition, new rules will make it easier for broadcasters to enrich their online output across borders, granting people better choice and access to content across borders and allowing European culture to flourish.

Questions and Answers – EU Cybersecurity

What has the EU done so far to reinforce cybersecurity? 

The EU has now a range of instruments to protect electronic communications networks, including the Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS Directive), the EU Cybersecurity Act, and the new telecoms rules.

The Directive has introduced new mechanisms for cooperation at EU level, measures to increase national capabilities and obligations for operators of essential services and digital service providers to adopt risk management practices and report significant incidents to the national authorities.

The Cybersecurity Act introduces, for the first time, EU wide rules for the cybersecurity certification of products, processes and services. In addition, the Cybersecurity Act sets a new permanent mandate for the EU Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA), as well as more resources allocated to the Agency to enable it to fulfil its goals.

According to the new telecoms rules (Electronic Communications Code), Member States have to ensure that the integrity and security of public communications networks are maintained, with obligations to ensure that operators take technical and organisational measures to appropriately manage any risks to the security of networks and services. It also provides that competent national regulatory authorities have powers, including the power to issue binding instructions and ensure compliance with them. In addition, Member States can attach conditions concerning the security of public networks against unauthorised access to the general authorisations for operators, for the purpose of protecting the confidentiality of communications.

Finally, in May 2019, the Council established a sanctions regime, which allows the EU to impose targeted restrictive measures to deter and respond to cyber-attacks which constitute an external threat to the EU and its Member States. The new sanctions regime is part of the EU’s cyber diplomacy toolbox, a framework for a joint EU diplomatic response to malicious cyber activities that allows the EU to make full use of measures within the Common Foreign and Security Policy, including, statements by the High Representative, diplomatic demarches and, if necessary, restrictive measures, to respond to malicious cyber activities.

What is the EU Cybersecurity Certification Framework and what are its advantages?

A European cybersecurity certification scheme is a comprehensive set of rules, technical requirements, standards and procedures, agreed at European level for the evaluation of the cybersecurity properties of a specific product, service or process.

Cybersecurity certification plays an important role in increasing trust and security in products, services and processes that are crucial for the proper functioning of the Digital Single Market. Given the large diversity and many uses of ICT products, services and processes, the European Cybersecurity Certification framework enables the creation of tailored and risk-based EU certification schemes.

In particular, each European scheme should specify: a) the categories of products and services covered, b) the cybersecurity requirements, for example by reference to standards or technical specifications, c) the type of evaluation (e.g. self-assessment or third party evaluation), and d) the intended level of assurance (e.g. basic, substantial and/or high).

To express the cybersecurity risk, a certificate may refer to three assurance levels (basic, substantial, high) that are commensurate with the level of the risk associated with the intended use of the product, service or process, in terms of the probability and impact of an incident. For example, a high assurance level means that the product that was certified has passed the highest security tests.

The resulting certificate will be recognised in all Member States, making it easier for businesses to trade across borders and for users to understand the security features of the product or service. This allows for beneficial competition between providers across the whole EU market, resulting in better products and higher value for money.

Security by design: The Framework also encourages manufacturers or providers involved in the design and development of products, services or processes to implement measures at the earliest stages of design and development. This will allow protecting the security of thoseproducts, services or processes to the highest possible degree, in such a way that the occurrence of cyberattacks is anticipated and minimised (“security-by-design”).

The European certification framework will rely as much as possible on international standards as a way to avoid creating trade barriers or technical interoperability problems.

Who will benefit from this certification framework and how? 

The ability to understand whether a product, system or service meets specific requirements lies at the heart of being able to trust the digital systems we rely on. The Framework will be therefore useful for:

  • Citizens and end-users (e.g. operators of essential services), who will be able to make more informed purchase decisions related to products and services they rely on a daily basis.For example a citizen, who is considering purchasing a Smart TV and is aware of the cybersecurity risks involved when connecting smart objects to the Internet, will be able to consult the European Cybersecurity Certification website of the EU Agency for Cybersecurity. They will be able to find a model that has been certified with the appropriate cybersecurity requirements, guidance from the vendor on how to setup, configure and operate the TV in a secure way and for how long the vendor commits to provide cybersecurity patches if new vulnerabilities are found.
  • Vendors and providers of products and services (including Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and new businesses), who will enjoy cost and time savings as they will undergo a single process for obtaining a European certificate which is valid, and therefore allows them to compete effectively, in all Member States.Besides, vendors of ICT products and services will be keen to make buyers aware possibly by using a specific label linked to the certificate.
  • Governments, who, like all individual and commercial buyers, will be better equipped to make informed purchase decisions.

To add further value to cybersecurity certification, manufacturers or providers of certified products, services or processes, including those for which an EU statement of conformity has been issued, shall provide specific supplementary cybersecurity information (e.g. guidance and recommendations to assist end users with secure configuration, installation, deployment, operation and maintenance of the products or services, etc.).

What will the added value of the Framework be for SMEs and start-ups, in particular?

SMEs and new businesses traditionally face more difficulties in expanding into new markets with different requirements. The Framework will help reduce such market-entry barriers for SMEs and new businesses because companies will have to undergo the certification process of their products only once and the corresponding certificate will be valid across the EU. Furthermore, as the demand for more secure solutions is expected to rise worldwide, companies, including SMEs, whose products are certified, will enjoy a competitive advantage to satisfy such a need. Moreover, the possibility for companies to self-attest conformity with security requirements for products, processes and services that present low risk makes the Framework even more attractive for SMEs and new businesses.

Take the example of an SME that develops and sells ICT applications to larger companies that require certain assurances that the applications are appropriately secure and that they have been developed following best practices when it comes to secure coding. Using a European Cybersecurity Certificate, that SME can demonstrate both the security of its products as well as its secure development practices, hence meeting the requirements of its clients not only in one Member State, as is often the case today, but also across the entire EU.

Will cybersecurity certification become mandatory?

Schemes established under the Framework are voluntary, i.e. vendors can decide themselves whether they would like their products to be certified under them. However, the Cybersecurity Act foresees that the Commission shall assess the efficiency and use of the adopted European cybersecurity certification schemes. In particular, it will assess whether a specific European cybersecurity certification scheme should become mandatory through relevant EU legislation to ensure an adequate level of cybersecurity of ICT products, services and processes and improve the functioning of the internal market. Moreover, other legislation at national or EU level could make use of existing schemes as a simple way to describe future obligations on products or systems.

How is the EU Agency for Cybersecurity being reinforced?

Until now the EU Agency for Cybersecurity had a temporary mandate, which was renewed last time in 2013 and was set to expire in 2020. The Cybersecurity Act gave the Agency a permanent mandate, thus putting it on a stable footing for the future.

The current tasks of the EU Agency for Cybersecurity, such as supporting policy development and implementation as well as cyber capacity building, have been strengthened and refocused. New tasks have been added, most prominently regarding cybersecurity certification.

The new mandate incorporates additional important tasks already entrusted to the EU Agency for Cybersecurity by the NIS Directive, which was agreed in 2016, such as the role of the secretariat of the Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) Network that brings together national CSIRTs of EU Member States. In order to fulfil these increased responsibilities the Agency’s staff can grow by 50% and the financial resources are doubled, increasing from 11 to 23 million EUR over a period of 5 years.

What are the main tasks of the EU Agency for Cybersecurity under the new mandate?

  • Support to policy implementation in the area of cybersecurity, especially the NIS Directive, as well as to other policy initiatives with cybersecurity elements in different sectors (e.g. energy, transport, finance). The EU Agency for Cybersecurity will also assist Member States in the implementation of specific cybersecurity aspects of Union policy and law relating to data protection and privacy.
  • Cybersecurity capacity building, for example with trainings to help improve EU and national public authorities’ capabilities and expertise, including on incident response and on the supervision of cybersecurity related regulatory measures.
  • Market related tasks (standardisation, cybersecurity certification), such as analysis of relevant trends in the cybersecurity market to better match demand and supply and support the EU policy development in the areas of ICT standardisation and ICT cybersecurity certification.
  • Operational cooperation and crisis management aimed at strengthening the existing preventive operational capabilities and supporting operational cooperation as secretariat of the CSIRTs Network. The EU Agency for Cybersecurity will also provide assistance to Member States who request it in order to handle incidents and will play a role in the EU coordinated response to large-scale cross-border cybersecurity incidents and crises.
  • Coordinated vulnerability disclosure: The EU Agency for Cybersecurity will assist Member States and Union institutions, agencies and bodies in establishing and implementing vulnerability disclosure policies on a voluntary basis. It will also help improve the cooperation between the organisations, manufacturers or providers of vulnerable products and services, and members of the cybersecurity research community who identify such vulnerabilities.

What is the European Commission’s recommendation for a common EU approach to the security of 5G networks?

Fifth Generation (5G) networks will form the future backbone of our societies and economies,including in many critical sectors such as energy, transport, banking, and health, highlighting the need to address any vulnerabilities with regard to security and trust. In March 2019 the European Commission recommended a set of operational steps and measures to ensure a high level of cybersecurity of 5G networks across the EU. In particular, it recommended to Member States to complete an EU-wide risk assessment by October 2019 and to identify a set of possible mitigating measures, by December 2019. For more information about the Recommendation, including next steps, see this press release and these Questions and Answers.

What are the next steps?

The European Commission has proposed to significantly boost investment in cybersecurity and advanced digital technologies in the EU in the next EU budget period, notably through its proposal for a Digital Europe Programme. It has also proposed a new European Cybersecurity Competence Centre and network to pool resources and coordinate on priorities with Member States and to implement relevant projects in the area of cybersecurity. The proposal also aims at creating a Network of National Coordination Centres and a Cybersecurity Competence Community in order to ensure better cooperation and synergies among the existing experts and specialist structures in the Member States. This goes hand-in-hand with the key objective to increase the competitiveness of the EU’s cybersecurity industry and to turn cybersecurity into a competitive advantage for other European industries.

EICMA,THE SUCCESS OF THE 76TH EDITION ON THE WEB AS WELL

The success of EICMA 2018 wins over the Internet as well. The most important Milanese week in the world for fans of two wheels was marked not only by the number of previews that were presented, pavilions that were visited and products that were seen close-up, but also by the amount of digital emotions that were aroused.
The 76th Edition of the International Bicycle, Motorcycle and Accessories Show closes at Fiera Milano-Rho with record numbers on the Internet as well. On the days of EICMA, the press offic e and the online editorial office took 10,000 photos, filmed over 47 hours of footage produced in six editing stations, published 160 pieces of news on the website of the event,di stributed 15 institutional press releases, edited 52 video footages of the stands and covered over 250 km in the exhibition grounds. All the se contents, including through the official digital and social platforms reached countless fans and professionals, with more than 900,000 visits to the eicma.it website and over 30,000 downloads of the dedicated app.
The numbers concerning the activity on the EICMA social channels are also amazing: 1.3 million users reached and over 6.4 million views of the posts on Facebook and more than 850,000 impressions on YouTube, with 200,000 minutes of views and almost 58,000 unique viewers. The Instagram channel, which during the event recorded +72% in the number of followers, was also very successful, reaching over 750,000 people with the photos and videos posted and totalizing some 2.5 million impressions. This trend was also confirmed by the popularity obtained by more than one hundred stories posted on the social media owned by Facebook, which totalized almost one million impressions. “ The social media, and more in general the Internet, not only made the competition global to involve new users, but,” commented the President of EICMA Andrea Dell’Orto , “they were at the same time cause and effect of the assertion of an increasingly demanding public of fans, that we were able to engage and win over with the quality of the content s produced. Approaching the Internet with quality is an exciting challenge and is also an advantage for the companies that choose EICMA to exhibit their products.
The digital success of this edition fills us with satisfaction, because we record another important stage in boosting our digital strategy.”
Antonio Gala

Fujitsu: Co-Creation for Success

This year, Fujitsu World Tour 2018, which stopped in Brussels on June 7, highlighted the “Co-Creation for Success“.

6 start-ups from the Hive Brussels network presented their innovations to more than 300 of Fujitsu’s most important customers and partners. As part of the “Labs Battle”, each start-up had 5 minutes to convince the public and the jury of the potential of their innovation. The laureate was n-Auth specialized on security of sensitive data.

We interviewed Mr. Yves de Beauregard, Managing Director Fujitsu Benelux who explained: “Today, digital co-creation is moving to a new phase, from concept to the creation of new opportunities. Our unique capabilities in advanced technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of Things, combined with know-how, achieve this goal, delivering true innovation and business value.

The complexity of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is more then a usage.  As example we have used AI in Order to develop a non destructive testing that’s the example of Siemens Gamesa using AI to analyse images and data in order to ensure that the wings of the windmills are produced with the highest quality possible because it is very expensive for those companies that have the necessity to dismantled in order to change the wings. For so far this is done by human beings that they are really checking and also using the experience in order to look after the quality of those wings . This is a typical example where the AI has actually got to learn what humans are looking after and ones the AI has learned, it can apply very easily to a massive data informations, in order to really detect what is not in line with the expectations.”

 What are the other applications of AI?

“Another example AI applications is in the medical industry. We have been using AI together with San Carlo hospital in Madrid, supporting doctors in case of psychiatric treatment and at first when they go to analysing which sickness has the patient. In the psychiatric treatment there is a number of interviews that are needed to really understand what is the behaviour and what are the symptoms to define the actual sickness. For this reason, psychiatry is not that digital. We developed together with S. Carlo Hospital a system based on AI that really try to measure the behaviour, the comportment, the answers of the questions submitted to the patients and therefore that are able to support doctors in making a diagnosis on what is the actual sickness that the patient is suffering . Therefore, this application help patient to get treated quicker and helps doctors, who have to do less interviews in order to define the proper sickness and, of course, it also helps public money because it really support the entire chain to do better, quicker and less expensive.”

The second topic is Cyber security.   

“Fujitsu has been recently nominated as one of the top leader in cybersecurity. We see the recent attack from malware. I am proud to say that none of the Fujitsu customer, have been drastically impacted. We are effecting protecting our customer proactively and reactively. The business of Fujitsu in cyber security significantly improving and growing. Number of new customers, new logos and new companies come and ask us to support them with regard to cyber security.”

With the Blockchain centre recently inaugurated in Brussels which development you can see?

“We are actually very amazed by the number of projects and request coming after the inauguration of the Blockchain centre in Brussels. We were definitely too shy in our plans. We are very intrigue by the number of companies that are actually embracing Blockchain technologies, in order to help them because is not easy to understand what is the value that such technologies could bring to your business. We have developed a kind of support that really help those companies to understand what means Blockchain for their business model, for their customers. In the same time we are moving  ahead with our research for Blockchain for smart cities and new projects keep on having a leading position on that market.”

Why do you think is an asset choose Brussels for the Blockchain centre?

Three most important reason. The first reason is that in Belgium there is a culture of settlement. There is a number of company working on functional settlement located in Brussels. So the culture of working as a chain or being in the middle of a chain, support people from the business to stream line, the processes, they are able to work better together is something that is strongly in Belgium. The second reason is obviously, because Brussels is located in the centre of Europe. The proximity with European institutions and finally also the language skills that is present in Belgium.”

How do you collaborate with Japan?

On Artificial Intelligence, cyber security and Blockchain there is a very strong collaboration with Japan. There is actually a very strong relationship. We can benefit in Europe also from the technology advancement that our colleagues have in Japan. Fujitsu is indeed a market leader in Japan and the biggest part of R&D done by Fujitsu is still predominantly in Japan. If we want to benefit from those R&D as quick as we can, we need to have those strong relationships with Japan.”

How was important for you to collaborate for 0 Plastic Rivers initiative?

I truly believe that a company in whatever the business is operating is a social body. That means we also have the responsibility to the society, to the next generation and to the environment. One of the stakeholders we need to be very careful is our environment and we believe that this initiative is very interesting. In 0 Plastic Rivers initiative I believe that sensor technologies and Artificial intelligence technologies, could really help in managing plastic waste issue by detecting plastics in the water. It is an important topic that matter to us and on which we believe. We can have an added value.”

Henry Borzi

Electric Vehicles and charging stations: best practices from Europe and Italy

Electric Vehicles and charging stations: best practices form Europe and Italy. Changing the behavior for a cleaner future

The 2nd Regional Stakeholder Meeting conference of EV Energy, hosted by Partner EUR S.p.A in its facilities in Rome last 19th of October 2017, involved experts and key stakeholders from Greenit Amsterdam region, Flevoland Province, Stockholm County Council, Chamber of Commerce of Barcelona, Kaunas University of Technology and the Municipalities Association of Anci Lazio, including representatives of ENEL S.p.A., GLS Italy, UMPI and the Mobility Service Agency of the City of Rome.

They all agreed that many cities and regions are setting tougher environmental goals than national governments to limit air pollution and to achieve the goals of the 2015 Paris climate agreement to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Zero emissions areas could mean more parks, pedestrian areas or roads where only electric powered vehicles could enter to make cities more attractive places to live. On this topics, Mariarosaria Marziali in charge of communication by Anci Lazio interviewed some attendees.

Marco Ghetti from UMPI Italian private company declared that “unfortunately e-infrastructures are not ready yet in our cities but existing infrastructures and assets can be exploited and turned into a e-mobility service network for EVs, starting from public lighting. “This is what UMPI can do and for sure in the next 15 years big part of the mobility transition will be completed”.

Donatas_Černiauskas from a Lithuanian ESCO company said that his ESCO is signing agreements with city authorities to develop charging system for EVs. However, there is still a relevant criticism as the National governments do not have yet target and goals for EVs and we don’t know yet who can manage the process of the mobility transition.

More optimistic was Cristian Bardaji from the Chamber of Commerce of Catalunia because a Strategic Plan 2016-2019 for the development of charging infrastructure for EVs has been implemented in Catalunia. With a budget of € 6 Million in 3 years Catalunia is implementing 100 charging stations to fast roads, 400 semi-fast charging stations and 25.000 charging points linked. Therefore, there are very good news from Catalunia. Cristian Bardaji explained that this choice of the Region is due to the fact that citizens ask for clean air.

Enrico Tagliaferri Manager of the Italian enterprise Share’ngo for Rome is optimistic as well about the future of the electric mobility in Italy. The plan of Share’ngo free-floating car sharing service is to introduce 2.000 new EVs in Milan and Rome. Share’ngo wants to create its own charging stations very soon, in order to quickly encounter the needs of the consumers.

Alberto Piglia, Head ofe- Mobility of Global Business Line e-Solutions for Enel strongly has believed in electric mobility since 2008. Enel implemented the first charging stations in Pisa in 2009. Today it is even possible to drive from Rome to Milan, thanks to the new fast charging stations installed in the highway last September. The investment plan of Enel is to install 7.000 new fast charging stations in Italy very soon. In addition, Enel to create a digital intelligence in order to manage the “batteries with wheels” in the best way to balance the power.

Michael Erman, Regional planner at County Council Stockholm, is optimistic as well. Stockholm is one of the most ambitious cities in EU to become one of the world’s leading clean vehicle cities by 2030. To achieve this, the City is developing e-infrastructures. 500 charging points on-street will be installed by 2020. Michael declared that the first objective must remain “local transport to be strengthened” while the second one is to allow people to buy EVs instead of polluting cars. But the EVs must be less expensive! An ongoing study in Sweden is the electrification of the public fleets (buses) that implies the implementation of charging facilities in all the

country. Michael concluded by saying that “Public transport and IT are very important in the context of the mobility transition”.

Remarkable is the “self-experimentation” of Hugo Niesing who is the designer, operator, subject, analyst, user and reporter of the experiment. From 2013 onward Hugo Niesing has successfully experimented a smart energy management in his house, producing and consuming energy, together with energy storage in an EV. He installed a 30m2 of solar panels, attaching an EV with available battery capacity of 10Kwh. Prior to the V2H installation and only with the aid of solar panels, 26% of the energy instantly consumed by the household came directly from this renewable energy source. But with the addition of the EV in the energy system, this self-sufficiency increased to 60%. This experiment paves the way for large scale adoption of renewable energies in urban environments. It is in fact in progress in a neighborhood of Amsterdam: the EVs act as energy storage.

Therefore, Hugo Niesing is completely right to be very optimistic regarding the mobility transition. It would be enough to follow his example.

Mariarosaria Marziali

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